Art Monthly Events

7-Mar-09
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Lorna Simpson

Interviewed by Alison Green

New York-based African-American artist Lorna Simpson came to prominence in the 1980s with challenging work that dealt with issues surrounding race, gender and sex. Though deceptively simple and extremely elegant, her juxtapositions of text and image pack a powerful punch, as in Untitled (2 necklines) of 1989, in which the text between two circular photographs of necklines reads: ?ring, surround, lasso, noose, eye, areola, halo, cuffs, collar, loop?, ending with the phrase, ?feel the ground sliding from under you?.

>>Play Lorna Simpson

13-Feb-09
Talk Show on Resonance FM

Dave Beech & Jennifer Thatcher

Presented by Matt Hale

Matt Hale in conversation with Dave Beech and Jennifer Thatcher discussing critical art after Postmodernism.

>>Play Dave Beech & Jennifer Thatcher

6-Dec-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Christian Boltanski

Interviewed by Rikke Hansen

French artist Christian Boltanski thinks of himself as a painter but is best known for his photographic installations. A photographer who often re-photographs found images, including family snapshots, he associates photography with death and describes himself as a ?cadaver merchant?. For the inaugural Folkestone Biennial of 2008, Boltanski created a moving sound piece, Whispers, comprising readings from the private love letters of soldiers and their lovers from the First World War.

>>Play Christian Boltanski

25-Oct-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Dennis Oppenheim

Interviewed by Lisa Le Feuvre

Dennis Oppenheim’s practice has taken in actions, performances, installations, sculptures, film, architecture and everything in between. Seminal early works include Cancelled Crop, 1969, a field was harvested in the form of an X, and Reading Position for Second Degree Burn, 1970, a photographic diptych of Oppenheim lying on Jones Beach in New York, one with an open book (titled Tactics) face down on his chest, and one without showing the void created after five hours exposed to the sun. In recent years he has returned to the object and created installations including the Garden for the Accused in New York.

>>Play Dennis Oppenheim

6-Oct-08
Roadshow

What is the Future of Art Education? Part 2

Chaired by Patricia Bickers at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham

What is the Future of Art Education?

In response to demand, Art Monthly organised two public debates: one in London in September and one in Birmingham in October. At these events readers were given the opportunity to question educational professionals and policy makers.

The panels debated the motion: ‘Is further privatisation, corporatisation and instrumentalism inevitable or are there alternatives?’ and responded directly to the question ‘What is the Future of Art Education?’

Panel:

Pavel Büchler, artist and research professor at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Phyllida Barlow, artist, professor of fine art and director of undergraduate studies at Slade.

Michael Corris, writer and professor of fine art at the Art & Design Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University.

Vaughan Grylls, artist and former director of Kent Institute of Art and Design.

27-Sep-08
Roadshow

What is the Future of Art Education? Part 1

Chaired by Patricia Bickers at the ICA, London

What is the Future of Art Education?

In response to demand, Art Monthly organised two public debates: one in London in September and one in Birmingham in October. At these events readers were given the opportunity to question educational professionals and policy makers.

The panels debated the motion: ‘Is further privatisation, corporatisation and instrumentalism inevitable or are there alternatives?Æ and responded directly to the question ‘What is the Future of Art Education?’

Panel:

Michael Corris is a writer and professor of fine art at the Art & Design Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University.

Lisa Le Feuvre is a writer, curator and lecturer on the curatorial programme at the Department of Art, Goldsmiths.

Paul Gough is chair of the art and design group of the Research Assessment Exercise and pro-vice chancellor at University of West of England in Bristol.

Irit Rogoff is an art historian and professor of visual cultures at Goldsmiths.

Paul Wood is the author of ‘Between God and the Saucepan’, a study of English art education from the 18th century to the present day, which will be published in the History of British Art in November 2008.

14-Jun-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Susan Hiller

Interviewed by Richard Grayson

Susan Hiller is renowned for making works that investigate everyday phenomena that are often overlooked. Previous subjects have included UFO sightings (Witness, 2000), horror movies (Wild Talents, 1997), near-death experiences (Clinic, 2004), Punch and Judy shows (An Entertainment, 1990) and dreams (Dream Mapping, 1974). She uses sound, video, text and photography, often creating large-scale installations. She has been described as a feminist, a conceptualist and a para-conceptualist.

>>Play Susan Hiller

31-May-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Cornelia Parker

Interviewed by Lisa Le Feuvre

?My work is all about the potential of materials ? even when it looks like they?ve lost all possibilities.? In the course of making her work, Cornelia Parker has shot at objects, thrown them from cliffs, blown them up and rolled over them with a steam roller. Her sculptural processes have been described as ?mimicking cartoon deaths?. Parker?s work is both dramatic and delicate, powerful and intricate ? out of destruction she creates tragedy and beauty.

>>Play Cornelia Parker

24-Apr-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Glenn Ligon

Interviewed by Patricia Bickers

I went to see, I went to see Logan?s Run,? right?
They had a movie of the future called Logan?s Run
There ain?t no niggers in it!
I said ?Well white folks ain?t planning for us to be here!?

[Text work by Glenn Ligon]

New York-based artist Glenn Ligon is renowned for works across a variety of media including sculpture, neons, drawing and painting that explore issues surrounding race, sexuality, identity, representation and language.

>>Play Glenn Ligon

29-Mar-08
Talking Art at Tate Modern

Gustav Metzger

Interviewed by Andrew Wilson

Gustav Metzger, born 1926, is the renowned artist and political activist who developed the concept of Auto-Destructive Art and co-organised the Destruction in Art Symposium in London in 1966. Metzger was also involved in the Fluxus movement and famously declared an Art Strike from 1977 to 1980. Concerned with environmental issues in art already in the 1970s, many of his projects are now seen as astonishingly prescient. After a career spanning decades, he is now in greater demand than ever, generating new projects as for Münster Sculpture Projects 2007 or realising earlier ideas, as with Project Stockholm, originally conceived in 1972 for the UN Environmental Conference in Stockholm. Now produced for the Sharjah Biennale (2007), the huge installation consists of 120 cars that discharge their exhaust fumes into a plastic structure.

>>Play Gustav Metzger

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